Cybercriminals Know They Can Use Social Media to Get Sensitive Corporate Information

22 April 2019 Internet, IT & e-Discovery Blog Blog
Authors: Peter Vogel

Darkreading.com posted a story that pointed out that “Social media is a great marketing tool for businesses. However, if companies continue to ignore — or misunderstand — the threat that it poses, it will become the go-to platform for cybercriminals looking to steal sensitive information or cause huge reputational damage when silly mistakes are missed.”  The April 22, 2019 story entitled “4 Tips to Protect Your Business Against Social Media Mistakes” included these “simple steps that businesses should take to ensure everything stays safe on company social accounts” in the Tip 4 Lack of Awareness:

Employees should be trained on corporate social media policies and be given a “best use” guide, demonstrating what they can and can’t do on corporate social media accounts.

Information about cyberattacks via social platforms should be circulated so employees know what to look out for and how to prevent a potential attack from happening.

Having simple practices in place, such as internal reviewing of content, means no tweet goes live without multiple approvals, reducing mistakes that have huge reputational impacts.

Limited access to the social corporate accounts should be in place. Not all employees should be given the passwords for the accounts; instead, the individuals that require access, or have been granted access, should have the login details sent to them privately and confidentially.

Passwords should be changed regularly and most definitely changed when an employee who had access leaves the organization.

Here are all 4 Tips:

  1. Reputational Damage
  2. The Slip of a Finger
  3. Social Phishing
  4. Lack of Awareness

No rocket science in this advice!!!!

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