Sabrina I. Houston

Senior Counsel

Overview

Dr. Sabrina I. Houston is senior counsel and an intellectual property lawyer with Foley & Larder LLP. Her practice focuses on strategic intellectual property counseling for small molecule compounds, nucleic acid-based technologies, antibodies, stem cells, nutraceuticals, diagnostics, food technology, and formulations. Sabrina is a member of the firm’s Chemical, Biotechnology & Pharmaceutical Practice. Sabrina is admitted to practice in California and before the United States Patent and Trademark Office; she is not admitted to practice in Texas.

Sabrina was previously an associate at Wilson, Sonsini, Goodrich & Rosati PC where she provided intellectual property counseling for start-up corporations. Her experience includes managing extensive domestic and foreign patent estates, patent application origination, IP-related due diligence, patentability/landscape analysis, freedom-to-operate analysis, and non-infringement/invalidity opinion drafting.

Education

Sabrina earned her law degree from George Washington Law School (J.D., 2010). She graduated from the University of Southern California (Ph.D., biochemistry and molecular biology, 2007) where she wrote her thesis titled, “Studies of the Biological Relevance of Histone H4 Lysine 20 Monomethylation: Discovery of its Role in the Cell Cycle and Localization within the Human Genome.” Sabrina earned her bachelor’s degree in molecular, cellular and development biology from the University of California (B.A., 2002). She was the recipient of the National Institutes of Health USC/Norris Cancer Center Pre-doctoral Fellowship and the California Breast Cancer Research Program Pre-doctoral Training Grant.

Admissions

  • California
  • The United States Patent and Trademark Office
Sabrina is not admitted to practice in Texas.

Selected Publications

  • Congdon L., Houston S.I., Veerapan, C. Spektor T., and Rice J.C., “PR-Set7-Mediated Monomethylation of Histone H4 Lysine 20 at Specific Genomic Regions Induces Transcriptional Repression,” 283(28) J. Cell. Biochem., 609-19, 2010
  • Houston S.I., McManus KJ, Adams MM, Sims JK, Carpenter PB, Hendzel MJ, Rice JC. “Catalytic function of the PR-Set7 histone H4 lysine 20 monomethyltransferase is essential for mitotic entry and genomic stability,” 283(28) J. Biol. Chem., 19478-88, 2008
  • Sims J.K., Magazinnik-Spektor T., Houston S.I., Wu S. and Rice J.C. “Histone Modifications and Epigenetics.” Epigenetics. Ed. Jorg Tost. Horizon Scientific Press, 2008
  • Sims, J.K., Houston, S.I., Magazinnik T, Rice JC. “A Trans-tail histone code defined by monomethylated H4 Lys-20 and H3 Lys-9 demarcates distinct regions of silent chromatin.” J. Biol. Chem., 2006 Mar 18 (281): 12760-6
  • Raghavan SC, Chastain P, Lee JS, Hegde BG, Houston S, Langen R, Hsieh CL, Haworth IS, Lieber MR. “Evidence for a triplex DNA conformation at the bcl-2 major breakpoint region of the t(14;18) translocation.” J. Biol. Chem., 2005 Jun 17 (280): 22749-60
  • Raghavan SC, Houston S, Hegde BG, Langen R, Haworth IS, Lieber MR. “Stability and strand asymmetry in the non-B DNA structure at the bcl-2 major breakpoint region.” J. Biol. Chem., 2004 Oct 29 (279): 46213-25