Paul E. Rosenthal

Retired Partner

Overview

Paul E. Rosenthal is a retired partner with Foley & Lardner LLP. As a member of the firm’s Real Estate Practice, he practiced in the areas of real estate acquisition and sales, zoning and land-use regulatory matters, local government and municipal law, and real estate financing. He has extensive experience in land development and municipal law, negotiating and preparing purchase and sale agreements in real estate transactions for individuals, businesses, and public companies. This work frequently involved review of land titles and surveys, and advising clients with respect to zoning, concurrency and comprehensive planning issues, and representation before government agencies. Mr. Rosenthal also served as title agent for various title companies and issued title insurance commitments and policies in connection therewith.

Mr. Rosenthal also represented home builders in connection with real estate acquisitions and sales, land development matters, and the formation of homeowner associations.

The representation of governmental entities was a significant part of Mr. Rosenthal’s practice. He has served as city attorney for the City of Ocoee since 1988. Mr. Rosenthal served as assistant city attorney for the City of Orlando and was later appointed the chief assistant to the mayor and city council. While Foley & Lardner was board counsel for the St. Johns River Water Management District, Mr. Rosenthal handled all district real estate acquisitions. Subsequently, Mr. Rosenthal represented the district as special counsel for land acquisition related to the Lake Apopka Restoration Project.

Mr. Rosenthal has applied his governmental experience to the effective representation of real estate developers. Illustrating the type of legal matters entrusted to him, he has represented clients in connection with the real estate due diligence for the acquisition of a major theme park, the purchase by a national franchisor of multiple locations of one of its franchisees, and the disposition of a $100 million multistate real estate portfolio. He has also represented national and local clients in the sale and disposition of lands for commercial and residential developments, including developments of regional impact.

Mr. Rosenthal served on the board of directors of Goodwill Industries of Central Florida from 1996 to 2002, including a term as treasurer of the organization. He was also appointed by the governor as a member and eventually chair of the Ninth Judicial Circuit Nominating Commission. Mr. Rosenthal has also been active in his college fraternity and has served on its International Board of Directors.

Mr. Rosenthal is a graduate of the University of Florida, where he received his law degree, with honors, in 1976 and his bachelor's degree in political science, with high honors, in 1973. While in college, Mr. Rosenthal served as president of Omicron Delta Kappa, captain of the Debate Team, secretary of Florida Blue Key, and president of Delta Upsilon Fraternity.

Mr. Rosenthal has been Peer Review Rated as AV® Preeminent™, the highest performance rating in Martindale-Hubbell's peer review rating system and was selected by his peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America® in the field of real estate law. In 2005, he was recognized as one of Florida’s Legal Elite™ by Florida Trend magazine, and was selected for inclusion in the 2006 - 2013 Florida Super Lawyers® lists.

Representative Matters

Showing of
Represented City of Ocoee, Florida in the demolition of an eight-story twin tower condominium project. The high-rise condominium had been closed by the Ocoee due to code violations. The project became a danger to the health and safety of the community. It was demolished by Ocoee on an emergency basis in a complex process which involved mailing over 2,000 notices.
Recovered $1.2 million for a real estate developer against a land owner that had defaulted under a contract for the purchase and development of land. The client pulled out of the deal when it became economically disadvantageous and Foley was able to prove that the primary default was the seller’s inability to secure timely development approvals.

Contact