Accessing China’s supply chain, consumer and capital markets in 2022 Legal and Practical Considerations

8 February 2022 Webinar Event

Location

Webinar

Agenda

11 a.m. PST

As we enter a third year of global pandemic and associated disruption, the need for business to access China’s supply chain, industrial base, consumer and capital markets has never been greater.  US business and investors need to access Chinese consumer markets, industry and capital to survive. 

During the past five years, the national security and reputational risks associated with U.S. investment in Chinese companies have increased substantially, but never has it become so fraught as in the past six months.  Examples include:

  • U.S. National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan stated that “We're also looking at the impact of outbound U.S. investment flows that could circumvent the spirit of export controls or otherwise enhance the technological capacity of our competitors in ways that harm America's national security.”

  • A Congressional panel urged restricting U.S. investment in China over security concerns.

  • Senators Cornyn and Casey introduced a bill to create an “outbound CFIUS” process to screen outbound investments to foreign adversaries, like China and Russia.

  • Senator Marco Rubio warned that “China is stealing between 300 and 600 billion dollars a year of American technology and intellectual property…They use venture capital funds to buy promising technology startups … They have weaponized a corporate lust for profits against us.”

  • The Wall Street Journal published several articles and op-eds such as BlackRock’s China Blunder: Pouring billions into the country now is a bad investment and imperils U.S. national security,” and “U.S. Companies Aid China’s Bid for Chip Dominance Despite Security Concerns; Silicon Valley venture-capital firms and chip-industry giants are ramping up deals in China’s semiconductor industry, alarming U.S. officials.”

  • A consumer group warned 10 state Governors that their pensions invest in Chinese companies without regard for China’s “ambitions to supplant the U.S. as the preeminent world power.”

As we look forward to 2022, the tension between the need to do business in China with the prevailing political pressure to decouple from the Chinese economy will come to a head, and new and highly restrictive regulation is expected in Washington.

Please join leading law firm Foley & Lardner LLP and Martin+Crumpton Group, a global business strategy and intelligence advisory firm, for a discussion of the current U.S.-China investment environment, including the growing risk factors associated with U.S. investment in Chinese companies.

The speakers will cover the practical steps that American businesses and investment firms can take to minimize exposure to legal and reputational risk.  The speakers will do a deep dive into the evolving tools that businesses and investors can leverage should they decide to de-risk through divestment or sale. 

Registration Link: pending

CLE

* Foley & Lardner LLP will apply for CLE credit after the program, wherever applicable. Foley & Lardner LLP certifies that this activity has been approved for California MCLE credits by the State Bar of California. Foley & Lardner LLP is a State Bar of California MCLE approved provider. New York licensed attorneys admitted two years or less are not eligible to earn CLE credit through nontraditional formats. This program is appropriate for experienced New York attorneys only. Certificates of attendance will be distributed to eligible participants approximately 8 weeks after the web conference via email.

Related Services

Accessing China’s supply chain, consumer and capital markets in 2022 Legal and Practical Considerations

Location

Webinar

Agenda

11 a.m. PST