Jeffrey C. Thrope

Partner

Overview

Jeffrey C. Thrope is a partner and health care business lawyer with Foley & Lardner LLP. Mr. Thrope has a broad range of experience as a general counsel to the health care and related industries, as well as not-for-profit organizations and governments. He is a member of the Health Care Industry Team, as well as the Public Finance Practice.

In addition to his considerable experience in helping public and safety-net hospitals develop operational and financing plans necessary to their survival, Mr. Thrope has provided advice and counsel in virtually every area of health care law, including health care institutional structuring and governance, compliance, network formation, litigation oversight, medical-legal and ethical issues, contracting, high technology acquisition and implementation, Internet and e-commerce activities, bank financing, reimbursement, dispute resolution (including litigation where necessary), labor, internal investigations, physician arrangements and credentialing and related matters. Mr. Thrope was instrumental in developing and implementing structures for the assisted living industry as it expanded into New York.

Mr. Thrope has provided similar services to governments, colleges and other not-for-profit entities in the educational field, and has a particular talent for helping maintain his clients’ mission, while addressing whatever legal issues they face. He has helped governments address structuring and financial issues, and has identified significant revenue and cost containment opportunities that have become more critical in these difficult times.

Prior to joining Foley, Mr. Thrope was a partner at Kalkines, Arky, Zall & Bernstein LLP (1988 to 2002), and then at Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP (2003 to 2009). He was an associate and partner at other firms from (1981-1987).

Recognition

Mr. Thrope was ranked as one of the top health care attorneys in New York by Chambers USA (2011 - 2017) and was selected for inclusion in the 2007 and 2016 New York Super Lawyers® lists. He has also been selected by his peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America© each year since 2011 in the field of health care.

Publications

Mr. Thrope is the co-author of books and articles, including:

  • Consent and Confidentiality in the Health Care of Children and Adolescents (Free Press, 1986)
  • Rights and Responsibilities of Young People in New York (New York City Youth Bureau, 1986), a guide for non-lawyers that is currently updated and republished by New York State Bar Association
  • Modern Federal Jury Instructions (Matthew Bender, 1985)

Thought Leadership

Mr. Thrope has spoken at various conferences and has contributed to course materials, including the Practicing Law Institute Faculty 1999: Understanding, Preventing and Litigating Year 2000 Issues - Health Care Industry.

Education

Mr. Thrope is a graduate of New York University School of Law (J.D., 1980), where he was a member of the Law Review, and a graduate of Yale University (B.A. 1977).

Mr. Thrope served as a law clerk to the Honorable Leonard B. Sand, Unites States District Court Judge for the Southern District of New York (1980-1981).

Admissions and Professional Memberships

Mr. Thrope also has served as a member of the Health Law and Family Courts Committees of the Association of the Bar of City of New York.

Mr. Thrope was admitted to the New York Bar in 1981, and is admitted to practice in the federal courts for the Southern and Eastern Districts of New York and before the Second Circuit Court of Appeals.

Representative Matters

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Foley's New York Health Law team assisted a large physician practice in responding to a broad-ranging subpoena served as part of an investigation by the FDA and the United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York.
Represented a large urban area acute care hospital in defense of multiple citations from OSHA for failing to comply with OSHA’s respiratory protection regulations. The work related to the outbreak of H1N1 (swine flu) in the United States, and at the time the hospital was flooded with patients. OSHA contended that all health care workers must use full respirators when treating H1N1 patients, a position the hospital contended is not scientifically supported and not practical if there is a major outbreak during the upcoming flu season. The case settled before trial on very favorable grounds.

Capabilities